Words With a Humorous Ring

Words With a Humorous Ring

This list below samples words with a colorful and rhythmic feel to them.

abracadabra
babel
backwash
balderdash
ballyhoo
bamboozled
bazinga
bedlam
bedlam
bicker
bobolink
brouhaha
bughouse
bumbershoot
bumfuzzle
bunkum
buzz
canoodle
cantankerous
carbuncle
catawampus
caterwaul
cattycorner
chickanery
clang
clatter
cockamamie
codswallop
collywobbles
comeuppance
conniption
coot
crapulence
didgeridoo
dingy
discombobulate
dither
donnybrook
doodle
doohickey
doozy
dudgeon
farrago
fatuous
fiddledeedee
filibuster
finagle
flanker
flibbertigibbet
flimflam

floozy
flummox
folderol
foozle
fricas
fungible
fuss
gadfly
gimcrack
girdle
gobbledygook
grog
gumption
habnab
hodgepodge
hoo-ha
hooligan
hootenanny
hornswoggle
hubbub
hullabaloo
hullabaloo
hurly-burly
jackanapes
janky
jiggerypokery
katydid
kerfuffle
kerplunk
kinkajou
kismet
klutz
logorrhea
knickers
lackadaisical
lollapaloosa
lollygag
loopy
malarkey
mollycoddle
monger
mugwumpery
namby-pamby
nincompoop
noggin
ornery
pandemonium
pantaloons
pecksniffian
persnickety
piffle
pigwidgeon
pinchbeck
popinjay

quibble
rambunctious
rapscallion
rattletybang
razzamatazz
rhubarb
rigmarole
rookery
rowdydow
rumpus
sardoodledom
scads
scootch
scroungy
scuttlebutt
shebang
shenanigan
shivaree
skedaddle
skulldog
skullduggery
slangwhanger
slipshod
smellfungus
snarky
snit
snuffle
spelunker
spigot
splotch
sprocket
sprog
squeegee
succubus
superfluity
swanky
swill
taradiddle
tater
tintamarre
to-do
topsy-turvy

tuchis
wabbit
waddle
walkabout
wankle
wasabi
wazoo
weasel
wenis
whirligig
wombat
wonky
yahoo

Regional Slang 

1. whoopensocker (n.), Wisconsin
You know when something’s wonderfully unique, but the words “wonderful” and “unique” don’t quite cut it? That’s why the Wisconsinites invented whoopensocker, which can refer to anything extraordinary of its kind—from a sweet dance move to a knee-melting kiss.

2. arsle (v.), Kentucky, Virginia, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Arkansas
Depending on the state, this word can mean a few things—to fidget, to back out of a place or situation, or to loaf around restlessly—pretty much all of which describe my activities on an average Sunday afternoon. (In Maine, instead of arsling, I might putty around, and in Vermont, I’d pestle around, but either way, it still means not a whole lot is getting done.)

3. jabble (v.), Virginia
You know when you’re standing at your front door rifling through your purse for fifteen minutes because you can’t find your keys again? That’s because all the stuff in your purse got all jabbled up. This fantastic little word means “to shake up or mix,” but it can also be used less literally, meaning “to confuse or to befuddle.”

4. sneetered (v.), Kentucky
If you’ve ever been hoodwinked, duped, swindled, fleeced or scammed, you done been sneetered. The noun version, sniter, refers to that treacherous person responsible for your unfortunate sneetering. Also see snollygoster, a shameless, unscrupulous person, especially a politician.

5. slatchy (adj.), Nantucket
This lovely little word describes the sky during a fleeting moment of sunshine or blue sky in the middle of a storm. The noun version, slatch, refers to that moment itself.

6. chinchy (adj.), South, South Midlands
This useful word perfectly describes your stingy friend who never chips in for gas.

7. mizzle-witted (adj.), South
This satisfyingly Dickensian word means “mentally dull,” but can also be used as the verb “mizzle”, meaning “to confuse,” “to depart in haste” or “to abscond,” or as a noun meaning, “a fine or misty rain.“ So, if you were a mizzle-witted burglar, you might break into a house, get mizzled, trip the alarm, and then mizzle with your loot into the mizzle.

8. burk (v.), Georgia, South
This utilitarian verb puts “vomit” or “fart” in a more acceptable term.

9. snuggy (n.) Iowa, Midlands
Those of us who grew up with older brothers are intimately familiar with what it is to suffer from a snuggy—a friendlier word for a wedgie.

10. bufflehead (n.), Pennsylvania (mountains)
A fool or idiot.

(from the Dictionary of American Regional English)

Written by The UnNovelist
The Unnovelist